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Summer SAVY 2016 (Session 1, Day 4) – Ecological Explorers

Posted by on Thursday, June 16, 2016 in Grade 1, Grade 2, SAVY.


Today we began talking about the question: “How can change in one part of an ecosystem affect other parts of the ecosystem?” The first part of the day was spent setting up our aquatic ecosystems. Each student group added the substrate (sand, gravel, or potting soil), plants, and animals that they had budgeted for. We then took observations of our ecosystems and shared these with the rest of the class. Students worked on listening to what others were finding and comparing/contrasting those observations to what they were seeing. We then discussed how all of the different parts of the aquatic ecosystem are connected and tracked how various changes would cascade through the ecosystem.

The weather allowed us one last trip to our terrestrial study sites. We took moisture and light measurements at each team’s hula-hoop location. Then inside we looked for patterns in our data and talked about how these patterns help create different habitats that could support different organisms. At the end of class we spent time more time at our investigation stations, learned about a crazy plant called kudzu, and added questions to our “I wonder” wall.

It’s amazing how time has flown by. The students and I are excited for our open house tomorrow! We’ll start altogether with a brief presentation by each student. Then you and your student will have free time to explore many amazing things we’ve been investigating in the classroom.

Today’s Dinner Table Tidbits:

Ask about how we measured moisture and light from each of the hula-hoops outside. Talk about which of the other hula-hoops were similar to theirs and which had environments that were different.

Ask your student about their aquatic ecosystem: What did they observe when they put together their aquarium? How do the different parts work together? What do they think will change by tomorrow?
Talk about what the students learned about kudzu in Tennessee.